IMPORTANT NOTE: All Organized Excursions included in our tailor-made private packages or purchased separately, can be executed as private experiences. Private Yachting is also available (additional cost applies).

Skiathos (Sporades)

The westernmost island of the Sporades, Skiathos' proximity to the peninsula in Magnesia, render it a great destination to combine both mainland and island destination in your Greek vacation. Due to its small size, the island of Skiathos never played a major role in antiquity. However, it holds a dear place in the heart of Greeks as it was the place where the first flag of modern Greece was created during the War for Independence.

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Kos (Dodecanese - Southeast Aegean)

The third largest of the Dodecanese islands, located in the southeastern corner of the Aegean, Kos is an attractive destination for locals and tourists alike. The island has a rich history which goes as far back as Homer's epic poem Iliad, and has been a point of interest for numerous civilizations, from the Ancient Greeks, to the Romans, the Ottomans, Byzantium and modern Italy.

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Koufonisia (Cyclades - South Aegean)

Koufonisia is a group of islands in the heart of Cyclades and the Aegean Sea. The group is divided into two islands: the Upper and the Lower one, with each one offering a different side to your vacation experience. Only the Upper part (Ano Koufonisi) is inhabited and this is where you will find hotels, restaurants, bars and sights, while the Lower part (Kato Koufonisi) is uninhabited, but admittedly the most naturally beautiful of the two. It can only be reach by boat from Ano Koufonisi.

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Rethymno (Crete)

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Kythnos (Cyclades - Northwest Aegean)

Kythnos is a small and quiet island in Western Cyclades, but one with a rich history. The island has two significant settlements, the capital called Messaria and the village of Dryopis. Both villages are notable for their winding and often stepped streets, too narrow for vehicular traffic. They are very picturesque but in different architectural styles. Messaria has the more-typical flat roofs of the Cyclades, while Dryopida's rooftops are slanted and tiled.

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Samos (North Aegean)

On the northeastern part of the Aegean and just a stone’s throw away from Turkey, Samos is a source of pride for any Greek, for it has been a site of scientific progress since antiquity. Due to its wine production, it became a powerful city-state in Ancient Greece and that gave Samians the comfort to invest in research. The Eupalinian aqueduct, a marvel of ancient engineering, still stands today as a UNESCO World Heritage Site to remind everyone of the significant role the island played in its heyday.

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Ikaria (North Aegean)

Just a few miles southwest of Samos, lies Ikaria, an alternative vacation spot that mainly attracts locals. Its name is derived by Icarus, who according to legend, fell on the sea nearby after his famous flight. The island’s history however extends even further, back to around 7000BC when it was populated by the Pelasgians. After being colonized by Greeks, Ikaria became part of the sea empire of Polycrates and remained predominantly under Greek rule until the early 16th century.

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Heraklion (Crete)

Heraklion is the largest city and the administrative capital of the island of Crete and the fourth largest city in Greece. A preferred destination in Europe, Heraklion can combine modernity and antiquity due its lively urban life and close proximity to historical monuments. The city's ancient name was revived in the 19th century and stems from the nearby Roman port of Heracleum (Heracles's city), whose exact location is unknown.

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Chania (Crete)

Although the second largest in Crete, Chania is a quaint town ideally suited for those looking for a relaxing vacation and an escape from the urban lifestyle. The town's history is rich, starting with the Minoan settlements, remnants of which are still excavated to this day. Cultural influences come from both the Byzantine and the Ottoman eras, but without a doubt, it was the Hellenistic period alond with the Venetian rule that shaped Chania to its current form.

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Agios Nikolaos (Crete)

The Cretan town of Agios Nikolaos has always served as a hub to the twenty or so small villages and farms that make up that part of the municipality of Lassithi. Agios Nikolaos takes its name from Saint Nicholas, the patron saint of sailors, and sits partially upon the ruins of the ancient city of Kamara. The town was settled in the late Bronze Age by Dorian occupants of Lato, at a time when the security of the Lato hillfort became a lesser concern and easy access to the harbor at Agios Nikolaos became more important.

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